303.732.5010
Free 10 Minute Initial Phone Consultation
Learn more about our firm. Meet an attorney with over 36 years of experience. Find out why you should hire a trial lawyer. Read Client Testimonials

Calculating Child Support in Denver, Colorado

Whenever parents split up, they both have the duty of providing financial support for the children they had together, regardless of whether or not the parents were married. In Colorado, these child support payments will calculated according to the "income shares model". Basically, what this model does is come up with how much both parents would spend on the child when they were all living together. That amount of support will be divided between the parents, depending on how much money each of them make, and depending on the child custody arrangement.

The exact calculations for child support are highly complex, however, so while you can use the electronic calculator or the manual worksheet provided by the Colorado State Judicial Branch, it is just a start. You can get a better idea of what would happen in your specific situation when you consult a Denver divorce attorney. To get an idea of what child support would look like, however, you can run calculations through one of two different worksheets. Under a parenting plan where the child spends at least 93 overnights with each parent, you could find the guidelines you need on Worksheet B ("Shared Physical Care"). Whenever one parent has sole physical care, meaning that the child spends 92 overnights or less with the other parent, then Worksheet A is what you need to look over.

One of the things you will need to figure out for these worksheets is both of your adjusted gross incomes. Gross income means all income coming in, such as wages, bonuses, rent, worker's compensation, pensions, etc. If a parent is receiving child support payments from a previous relationship, this will not be counted as income.

To adjust this income, any parent who is getting spousal support (alimony) would count that as part of their income. Any parent who is already paying child support for a child who lives with them can deduct 75 percent of their basic support obligation from their gross income. Then there are other expenses to take into account, such as a health insurance policy, private school, costs related to special needs, the expense of travelling for visitation, etc. These costs would be split by the parents based on their incomes.

As with child custody, a judge will want child support payments to be in the best interests of the child. So this means that a court will deviate from the child support guidelines when necessary.

Modifying Child Support in Colorado

Child support lasts up till the end of the month when the child turns 18 years old after finishing high school, or at the end of the month where the child turns 19 while a full-time high school student. If child support needs to be altered before that time, then there has to be a substantial reason for doing so. Perhaps your child has significant and lasting medical expenses that need to be paid, or perhaps one parent got a large promotion at work; these could mean that the amount of child support gets increased. Maybe a parent lost a job through no fault of their own, in which case, a court might lower child support payments.

For information on child support and any post-divorce modifications you need to make, contact Sturniolo & Associates. Our firm has more than 36 years of experience. When you work with us, you can know that your case is getting the personal attention it deserves from a Denver divorce lawyer, one who is dedicated to serving our clients with integrity. Learn what a dedicated legal advocate can do for you and your family when you call us today!

Sturniolo & Associates - Denver Divorce Attorney
Located at 5353 W Dartmouth Ave #202 Denver, CO 80227. View Map
Phone: (303) 732-5010 | Local Phone: (303) 831-4400.
Website:
© 2019 All Rights Reserved.
Internet Marketing Experts The information on this website is for general information purposes only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice for any individual case or situation. This information is not intended to create, and receipt or viewing does not constitute, an attorney-client relationship.